Europe

Tue
29
Nov
2016
New translation available
Submitted by Gary

In the Czech Republic soldiers have reportedly started touring elementary schools nationwide in an effort to introduce students to military life. Children from the age of 10 are being familiarized with and encouraged to play with machine guns....

Fri
14
Feb

Chris Rossdale, City University London: Raising awareness, taking action: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Chris Rossdale, City University London: Raising awareness, taking action: video
Fri
14
Feb

Victoria Basham, Exeter University: The militarisation of childhood in the UK - some recent trends: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Victoria Basham, Exeter University: The militarisation of childhood in the UK - some recent trends: video
Fri
14
Feb

Sarah Bulmer, Exeter University & David Jackson, Veteran to Veteran: Rethinking the Veteran : video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Sarah Bulmer, Exeter University & David Jackson, Veteran to Veteran: Rethinking the Veteran : video
Fri
14
Feb

Bryan Mabee, Queen Mary University London: Militarism in context -- the policy framework: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Bryan Mabee, Queen Mary University London: Militarism in context -- the policy framework: video
Fri
14
Feb

Diana Francis, Looking at everyday militarisation

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Diana Francis, Looking at everyday militarisation
Fri
14
Feb

Questioning the Presence of the Armed Forces in Schools: report

Questioning the Presence of the Armed Forces in Schools

 Forces Watch - 

WHY AND  HOW THE ARMED FORCES ENGAGE WITH SCHOOLS

The armed forces engage with schools and colleges in a wide variety of ways, from providing lesson plans and teaching resources, to presentation teams in assemblies, careers talks, away days, Cadet forces, etc.

For the armed forces, the primary purpose of providing resources and activities for schools and colleges is not to benefit the school.

A report published by the Ministry of Defence in 2007, called ‘Engagement with UK Schools’, stated that:

Fri
14
Feb

Military activity in UK schools: report

Military activity in UK schools

Forces Watch -  Updated May 2013

This briefing outlines the methods and rationale of the military's engagement with young people within the education system and highlights potential developments in this area, including projects under consideration or development by the Armed Forces and the Department of Education.

Armed forces activities in schools and colleges

Each of the three services that make up the Armed Forces, as well as the Ministry of Defence, have their own education and outreach programmes to engage with young people. Of the three, the Army has the most extensive programme of activities, reflecting their need to recruit more young soldiers.

Fri
14
Feb

Camouflage Kids: How the military affects young people's lives: publication

Camouflage Kids: How the military affects young people's lives

A ForcesWatch poster showing policy, cultural and other recent developments affecting the extent of military influence in young people's lives.

Fri
14
Feb


Military expansion in the universities of Andalusia.

Almería: Primera jornada sobre Seguridad y Defensa


On the celebration of the Global Day of Action Against Military Spending (April 15 2013), the Non-violent and Anti-militarist Network in Andalusia (R.A.N.A in Spanish) submitted a press release and a dossier on military interventionism in Andalusian colleges and universities: http://redantimilitarista.wordpress.com/2013/04/16/con-motivo-del-15-de-... y 
http://redantimilitarista.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/defensa-universida...

Thu
13
Feb

Young age at Army enlistment is associated with greater war zone risks: An analysis of British Army fatalities in Afghanistan: report

A young British soldier. Photograph: Shawn Baldwin/EPA

David Gee and Anna Goodman -

The risk of fatality in Afghanistan for recruits who enlisted into the British Army aged 16 and completed training has been twice as high as it has for those enlisting at 18 or above.

The increased risk reflects the disproportionately high number of 16 year olds who join front-line Infantry roles. This is the result of recruitment policies which drive young people with limited academic qualifications into the Army’s most dangerous roles. Those who enlist at 16 are effectively barred from entering many of the less risky support or technical roles due to lack of qualifications. Another probable contributing factor is the longer average career length of 16 year old recruits who successfully complete training, leading to more tours of duty in Afghanistan when compared with adult recruits.

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