Europe

Thu
16
Apr
2015
New translation available
Submitted by hannah

“Suppose there’s a war and nobody turns up.”

Exhibition / Events / Talk / Memorial / Film in celebration of International Conscientious Objectors Day
At Neuwagenmühle in...

Fri
07
Mar

Quotes from WRI's Countering the Militarisation of Youth conference: Public discourse and Education

Public discourse

They are constantly selling the idea that Venezuela is going to be invaded by the United States and in the face of this external threat...there is a permanent feeling of being on the verge of war or armed conflict...They always say that the United State wants Venezuela’s oil, however our president Chávez negotiated with transnational energy companies for 30 to 40 years. This means that that argument is invalid... - Rafael Uzcategui, Venezuela

Fri
14
Feb

Mind the Gap: Education for minors in the British armed forces: report

Mind the Gap: Education for minors in the British armed forces

Child Soldiers International / Forces Watch -

 The minimum recruitment age for the British armed forces – 16 years – is one of the lowest in the world. The Ministry of Defence has traditionally justified recruiting from this age group by asserting that 16 years reflects the minimum statutory school leaving age.

However, as a result of successive governments’ policies to increase upper secondary education participation rates, over recent decades the number of young people leaving education and entering employment before the age of 18 has decreased significantly. Today, only a very small percentage of young people leave education at 16 (six per cent in 2009/2010). Apart from the Ministry of Defence, the only other institution which seeks to attract and retain this age group is the education system itself. It is with schools and colleges, not other employers, that the Ministry of Defence directly competes to recruit young people.

Fri
14
Feb

Chris Rossdale, City University London: Raising awareness, taking action: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Chris Rossdale, City University London: Raising awareness, taking action: video
Fri
14
Feb

Victoria Basham, Exeter University: The militarisation of childhood in the UK - some recent trends: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Victoria Basham, Exeter University: The militarisation of childhood in the UK - some recent trends: video
Fri
14
Feb

Sarah Bulmer, Exeter University & David Jackson, Veteran to Veteran: Rethinking the Veteran : video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Sarah Bulmer, Exeter University & David Jackson, Veteran to Veteran: Rethinking the Veteran : video
Fri
14
Feb

Bryan Mabee, Queen Mary University London: Militarism in context -- the policy framework: video

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Bryan Mabee, Queen Mary University London: Militarism in context -- the policy framework: video
Fri
14
Feb

Diana Francis, Looking at everyday militarisation

Forces Watch -

The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Diana Francis, Looking at everyday militarisation
Fri
14
Feb

Questioning the Presence of the Armed Forces in Schools: report

Questioning the Presence of the Armed Forces in Schools

 Forces Watch - 

WHY AND  HOW THE ARMED FORCES ENGAGE WITH SCHOOLS

The armed forces engage with schools and colleges in a wide variety of ways, from providing lesson plans and teaching resources, to presentation teams in assemblies, careers talks, away days, Cadet forces, etc.

For the armed forces, the primary purpose of providing resources and activities for schools and colleges is not to benefit the school.

A report published by the Ministry of Defence in 2007, called ‘Engagement with UK Schools’, stated that:

Fri
14
Feb

Military activity in UK schools: report

Military activity in UK schools

Forces Watch -  Updated May 2013

This briefing outlines the methods and rationale of the military's engagement with young people within the education system and highlights potential developments in this area, including projects under consideration or development by the Armed Forces and the Department of Education.

Armed forces activities in schools and colleges

Each of the three services that make up the Armed Forces, as well as the Ministry of Defence, have their own education and outreach programmes to engage with young people. Of the three, the Army has the most extensive programme of activities, reflecting their need to recruit more young soldiers.

Fri
14
Feb

Camouflage Kids: How the military affects young people's lives: publication

Camouflage Kids: How the military affects young people's lives

A ForcesWatch poster showing policy, cultural and other recent developments affecting the extent of military influence in young people's lives.

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