Education-Military-Industrial Complex

Thu
31
Mar
2016
New translation available
Submitted by hannah

By Burgos Online

The article, “El ojo que todo lo ve” or “The All-seeing Eye” by Burgos Online paints a picture, but not for the purpose of artistic beauty, but rather...

Thu
22
Jan

Veterans bring ‘military ethos’ to schools

The pupils of year five at St Aloysius Catholic primary in Roby, Liverpool stand shoulder to shoulder, listening closely as the man in combat trousers and army boots outlines the task ahead.

Dressed in their blue PE shorts and white tops, they stand tall as the instructor speaks. First they have to imagine they are stranded in a desert and work out what they need to survive.

Read more...

Source: The Guardian

Photo credit: Commando Joe’s

Fri
19
Dec

The UK – Recruiting An Army Of Teenagers

Did you know that the UK armed forces recruit 16-year-olds? Owen Everett from ForcesWatch explores the UK military’s wide influence in the education system and the concerns that arise from this.

The UK is the only country in the European Union that recruits 16-year-olds, and the influence of the UK military within UK schools, colleges, and universities is increasing. This article focuses upon the military’s influence in secondary schools and colleges, and challenges the ethics of the UK’s military recruitment.

Wed
26
Nov

Principals learn about Army opportunities

Command Sgt. Maj. Willie Clemmons, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, talks about the Army core values as he addresses National Association of Secondary School Principals and U.S. Army Leadership and Professional Development Symposium participants Nov. 13 at the Lewis and Clark Center. Photo by Prudence Siebert/Fort Leavenworth Lamp

By Jennifer Walleman / Fort Leavenworth Lamp -

Note: The military claims that it does not focus on recruiting low-income people.

The National Assn. of Secondary School Principals partnered with the Army to sponsor this symposium at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, in the United States. The principals were chosen because they are from schools serving students living in poverty. Notice the final quote at the end from one of them:

“Now that I have a better understanding of what the Army can offer, I’m going to sit down with the recruiter back home, and I’m going to have him be a little bit more aggressive with our kids and give him more opportunities to (reach) kids and explain to them how and why the military might be a good solution to actually help them be a success.”

Wed
26
Nov

Anti-war group decries USF's ties to military

Gage Lacharite, center, head of the local branch of Students for a Democratic Society, prepares to hand out “counter-recruiting” fliers at USF's Marshall Student Center. JAY CONNER

/ Tampa Tribune

TAMPA — Counter-recruiting. Demands that the university break ties with the military. A mass die-in.

It may not be the 1960s, but Students for a Democratic Society is dusting off the old playbook to launch an anti-war, anti-U.S. military campaign at the University of South Florida.

SDS, perhaps the largest and most influential radical student organization of the 1960s, is springing back to life in the wake of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. SDSers from USF have scheduled a news conference today to demand that the university sever memorandums of understanding it has entered into with U.S. Central Command based at  MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, and U.S. Southern Command based in Miami.

Fri
14
Nov

Why is a Christian school promoting an arms company?

The arms company BAE Systems, along with the Royal Air Force, has run a 'science roadshow' for pupils at a Christian school in central London. The school is a few minutes' walk from where I live.

The school, St Marylebone Church of England School, aims to "nurture respect for religious, moral and spiritual values" and to help pupils to "understand the interdependence of individuals, groups and nations".

BAE Systems is a multinational arms firm, selling weapons to oppressive and aggressive regimes around the globe.

Mon
10
Nov

Bloodbath at Careers fair

Shell and BAE Systems get a surprise transfusion from angry students at careers event

Did you hear about those girls who threw blood at BAE and Shell representatives in the Parkinson last week? No? Well we’ve got the video.

BAE Systems –the other recipient of an impromptu blood donation – is the world’s second-largest aerospace, defence and information security company.

Bloodbath at Careers fair
Fri
31
Oct

Protesters disrupt conference on military space law

This action took place as part of the International Week of Action for Military-Free Education and Research #milifreeedu

“A rational dialogue with the administration will not solve the issues at hand.”

These were the words of a protester at the disturbance of McGill’s Institute of Air and Space Law (IASL)’s five-day Strategic Space Law Intensive Program on October 28. The program is meant to train lawyers in how to navigate space law. About ten people, mostly McGill students, disrupted the conference taking place at the Best Western hotel with chanting and condemnations of the program before pushing past security and escaping arrest.

Tue
28
Oct

Bloodhound SSC: is a project inspiring students to work for the military sustainable?

This article was published as part of the International Week of Action for Military-Free Education and Research #milifreeedu

Bloodhound SSC is an engineering project that aims to break the 1000mph World Land Speed Record with a rocket-propelled car. Since starting in 2008, the project has been widely praised for its ambition and technology. However, an interview given by the project’s Senior Design Engineer  in April this year suggests that the project was only set up to address a skill shortage within the military. Besides that UWE is heavily involved to serve the military, drawing on the recently published “Arms to Renewables” report by Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT), I highlight broader implications for employability and sustainability.

Tue
21
Oct

No draft, but not signing up can be hurdle

The last time Danieldevel Davis got out of prison it was 2012 and he was 38.

He'd been locked up for six years, which was the longest he'd ever lived in one place. Davis grew up in foster homes, dropped out of school in the 11th grade, and then hit the revolving door: streets, juvenile detention, streets, prison. He's never possessed a driver's license. He's never had a bill in his name.

"I've never had anything in my name," he says.

So, this is what happened when Davis went to fill out his financial aid paperwork at a Virginia Beach technical college.

"Have you registered for the Selective Service?" the financial aid officer asked.

"What do you mean?" Davis said.

"Did you register to be drafted?"

"Huh?"

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