Britain

Fri
20
Mar
2015
New translation available
Submitted by antimili-youth

By Tracy Walker, Nottingham Post

Nottingham city centre stood to attention when shoppers were given an insight into life in the Armed forces.

Regular Army and Army reserve units from across the Midlands hosted a recruitment...

Wed
29
Jan

Woodcraft Folk U.K.: Motion 5: Campaign Against Military Recruitment in Schools: article

Young Kinsfolk delegates

This Annual General Meeting supports the DF movement’s campaign against military recruitment in schools. Woodcraft Folk calls for an end to the recruitment of children into the armed forces as it goes against our Aims and Principles as well as contravening the recommendations of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.

We call on the relevant Minister in the Ministry of Defence (currently Mark Francois MP) to change their recruitment practices in light of the UK’s ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child which opposes the recruitment of children into the armed forces.

This Annual Gathering also recognises that the new Woodcraft Folk campaign “Our Times” on war and politics is a good opportunity for this issue to be discussed and campaigned on. We see this issue as a priority for young people and recommend that the campaign reflects this.

Proposed and seconded by: DF Committee

Wed
29
Jan

British army criticised for recruiting 16 year olds

Britain is one of just 19 countries that still recruit 16-year-olds to the armed forces. A new report claims that younger recruits are more likely to suffer from PTSD, alcohol problems and suicide than those who join as adults. This video tells the story of David Buck who joined the army at 17 but now feels he was conned by misleading recruitment marketing.

Source: http://www.theguardian.com

British army criticised for recruiting 16 year olds
Tue
21
Jan

Saskia Neibig, Woodcraft Folk: Raising awareness, taking action

Saskia Neibig, from Woodcraft Folk talks about raising awareness and taking action.

Saskia was involved in the Woodcraft Folk's Campaign Against Military Recruitment in Schools, which is still active.

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Saskia Neibig, Woodcraft Folk: Raising awareness, taking action
Mon
20
Jan

Emma Sangster: Young people and the British military

Emma Sangster, from Forces Watch, on how the British military interacts with young people.

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The Militarisation in Everyday Life in the UK conference was held in London in October 2013 and was organised by ForcesWatch. It brought together academics, writers, activists and campaigners who are researching, writing, campaigning on, or just concerned about the implications of the militarisation of everyday life in the UK.

Emma Sangster: Young people and the British military
Thu
16
Jan

Young age at Army enlistment is associated with greater war zone risks: An analysis of British Army fatalities in Afghanistan August 2013: report

David Gee and Anna Goodman -

Published by ForcesWatch and Child Soldiers International, August 2013

The risk of fatality in Afghanistan for recruits who enlisted into the British Army aged 16 and completed training has been twice as high as it has for those enlisting at 18 or above.

The increased risk reflects the disproportionately high number of 16 year olds who join front-line Infantry roles. This is the result of recruitment policies which drive young people with limited academic qualifications into the Army’s most dangerous roles. Those who enlist at 16 are effectively barred from entering many of the less risky support or technical roles due to lack of qualifications. Another probable contributing factor is the longer average career length of 16 year old recruits who successfully complete training, leading to more tours of duty in Afghanistan when compared with adult recruits.

Wed
15
Jan

Child Soldiers International on the kids being trained to kill

Rachel Taylor from Child Soldiers International talks to the host of Going Underground, Afshin Rattansi, about military recruitment age in the UK -- it's the lowest age in the Europe and the MoD doesn't want to change that. First aired 11.11.13

Child Soldiers International on the kids being trained to kill
Tue
14
Jan

Militarisation in everyday life in the UK: a conference report

Armed Forces Community Covenant on our commitment to serving armed forces personnel, veterans and their families in Barnsley

ForcesWatch -

Many areas of society in the UK have seen a growing involvement and/or visibility of the military and military approaches in recent years - from schools, to local communities, to ‘militainment’ (military-themed films, TV programmes, video games etc). This process of privileging and prioritising the military is often referred to as ‘militarisation’; Cynthia Enloe, one of the foremost thinkers on the subject, states that “To become militarised is to adopt militaristic values and priorities as one's own, to see military solutions as particularly effective, to see the world as a dangerous place best approached with militaristic attitudes.”

Tue
14
Jan

Mind the Gap: Education for minors in the British armed forces

mind the gap

Forces Watch -

The minimum recruitment age for the British armed forces – 16 years – is one of the lowest in the world. The Ministry of Defence has traditionally justified recruiting from this age group by asserting that 16 years reflects the minimum statutory school leaving age.

However, as a result of successive governments’ policies to increase upper secondary education participation rates, over recent decades the number of young people leaving education and entering employment before the age of 18 has decreased significantly. Today, only a very small percentage of young people leave education at 16 (six per cent in 2009/2010). Apart from the Ministry of Defence, the only other institution which seeks to attract and retain this age group is the education system itself. It is with schools and colleges, not other employers, that the Ministry of Defence directly competes to recruit young people.

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