Britain

Fri
20
Mar
2015
New translation available
Submitted by antimili-youth

By Tracy Walker, Nottingham Post

Nottingham city centre stood to attention when shoppers were given an insight into life in the Armed forces.

Regular Army and Army reserve units from across the Midlands hosted a recruitment...

Tue
19
Apr

UK firm 'employed former child soldiers' as mercenaries in Iraq

By Alice Ross, The Guardian

A former senior director at a British firm says that it employed mercenaries from Sierra Leone to work in Iraq because they were cheaper than Europeans and did not check if they were former child soldiers.

Tue
05
Apr

Military industrial complex: British Army teams up with big business to swell ranks

Russia Today

With recruitment in crisis, the British Army is teaming up with private firms to encourage their workers to join the Armed Forces’ “woefully undermanned” reserves.

The army now has a group of officers at its Hampshire HQ who are dedicated “accounts managers,” building relationships between business and the military, according to reports.

The initiative is led by reservist Major General John Crackett. He told the Financial Times on Tuesday his corporate background has prepared him for the role.

I’m a businessman more than I’m an army officer,” he said, claiming he is well placed to interpret what businesses want.

He said the military must get better at marketing itself by focusing on what it could offer employers.

Wed
23
Mar

Military propaganda on children's radio

Last year, British children's radio station Fun Kids Radio broadcast a series called 'Life in the Armed Forces', which is little more than military propaganda. This is the first video in the series. They have 350,000 listeners in the UK.

Military propaganda on children's radio
Mon
21
Mar

Liverpool students take on arms companies

by Rachel Melly

Last week two of the world’s largest arms companies gave a talk at the University of Liverpool.

About 50% of Thales’s business is in arms, including mortar systems, rocket systems for helicopters, precision-guided munitions, military vehicles, missiles, and small arms and ammunition. They sells arms to many oppressive regimes, including Bahrain, China, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and UAE, and collaborate with Israeli arms company Elbit to develop drones.

Rolls-Royce manufacture 25% of all military jet engines globally, that are used by 160 different armed forces, in 103 different countries. They also manufacture nuclear reactors for Trident submarines. Their arms customers include Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Egypt, Qatar, and Turkey

Thu
11
Feb

Warwick Students shut down a BAE Systems recruitment event

BAE Systems, a British multinational defence, security and aerospace company, tried to hold a recruitment event at the University of Warwick at the end of November, but students were not happy that their university was playing host to such an unethical company. After less than half an hour of protest, with a banner and chanting, the recruiters from BAE Systems packed up and the event was called off.

Students, including from Warwick for Free Education and Fossil Free Warwick, announced that they would disrupt the event. They spoke about the immoral and corrupt business dealings of the company. The protesters believe that arms companies should not have a relationship with the University of Warwick and should not be allowed to buy the right to recruit on their campus.

BAE representatives pack up their equipment after it is made clear that no students are going to listen to their presentation.

Fri
18
Dec

British Army urged to stop using armed teenagers to guard barracks

By Shiv Malik, The Guardian

ForcesWatch report calls on UK military to stop recruiting minors altogether, as armed forces bill due for third reading

Britain’s military should stop using armed under-18s to guard soldiers’ barracks, a report into Ministry of Defence recruitment practices is set to say.

Thu
02
Jul

Army rules for under-18s 'unlawful' - the UK

Army regulations are unlawfully requiring soldiers who join up before their 18th birthday to serve a longer minimum period than those who enlist as adults, it has been claimed in the High Court.

A judge heard accusations that the difference in treatment was causing real distress to young soldiers who wished to leave but were prohibited from doing so.

The accusations were made by Child Soldiers International (CSI), a charity that seeks to prevent the use of children in armed conflicts around the world and to protect the welfare of young soldiers.

The charity is asking Mr Justice Kenneth Parker, sitting in London, to declare that provisions of the Army Terms of Service Regulations 2007 are resulting in "less favourable treatment" for under-18s and are unlawful under the European Equal Treatment Directive.

David Wolfe QC, representing CSI, said the minimum service period applied to adult Army recruits was four years.

Mon
29
Jun

The British Armed Forces need to stop targeting and recruiting children

By Lee Williams

Soldiers aged between 16 and 18 are twice as likely to die on the battlefield, and have a much higher suicide rate than the average for their age

The UK is one of only 19 countries in the world that still recruits 16 year olds into its armed forces. The others include North Korea and Iran. What's more, British teenagers – otherwise deemed too young to drive a car, drink alcohol or marry – are twice as likely to be killed as personnel recruited over the age of 18. Mental illness is also more prevalent in these recruits, with a suicide rate 82 per cent higher than civilians of the same age.

Fri
26
Jun

David Gee explores the mental health issues of youth recruitment on ‘Armed Forces Day’

By David Gee

Although not all veterans are severely affected, a military career carries significant mental health risks, particularly at times of war when substantial numbers of psychiatric casualties are usual. Research from the last decade shows that certain mental health-related problems in the armed forces, particularly harmful alcohol use and post-deployment violent behaviour, are a serious problem. Those who have left the forces during the last decade show markedly higher rates of a number of mental health-related problems, particularly PTSD and harmful levels of drinking. These issues are of particular concern in relation to ‘Armed Forces Day’, which serves among other things as a recruitment opportunity for the armed forces. But what are the mental health implications for those who enlist, particularly the youngest recruits who are most vulnerable to these risks?

Wed
24
Jun

Action Man: Battlefield Casuaties

Battlefield Casualties is a video produced by Veterans for Peace that highlights the cost of war, featuring Action Man dolls with accessories including antidepressants, wheelchairs, “benefits cancelled” letters and body bags – inspired, said artist Darren Cullen and film-maker Price James, by official Armed Forces toys, which include a Predator drone playset for five-year-olds.

Trigger warning: this video contains images and themes of depression, illegal drug use, death and suicide.

Action Man: Battlefield Casuaties

Pages

Subscribe to Britain