Britain

Fri
20
Mar
2015
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Submitted by antimili-youth

By Tracy Walker, Nottingham Post

Nottingham city centre stood to attention when shoppers were given an insight into life in the Armed forces.

Regular Army and Army reserve units from across the Midlands hosted a recruitment...

Mon
29
Jun

The British Armed Forces need to stop targeting and recruiting children

By Lee Williams

Soldiers aged between 16 and 18 are twice as likely to die on the battlefield, and have a much higher suicide rate than the average for their age

The UK is one of only 19 countries in the world that still recruits 16 year olds into its armed forces. The others include North Korea and Iran. What's more, British teenagers – otherwise deemed too young to drive a car, drink alcohol or marry – are twice as likely to be killed as personnel recruited over the age of 18. Mental illness is also more prevalent in these recruits, with a suicide rate 82 per cent higher than civilians of the same age.

Fri
26
Jun

David Gee explores the mental health issues of youth recruitment on ‘Armed Forces Day’

By David Gee

Although not all veterans are severely affected, a military career carries significant mental health risks, particularly at times of war when substantial numbers of psychiatric casualties are usual. Research from the last decade shows that certain mental health-related problems in the armed forces, particularly harmful alcohol use and post-deployment violent behaviour, are a serious problem. Those who have left the forces during the last decade show markedly higher rates of a number of mental health-related problems, particularly PTSD and harmful levels of drinking. These issues are of particular concern in relation to ‘Armed Forces Day’, which serves among other things as a recruitment opportunity for the armed forces. But what are the mental health implications for those who enlist, particularly the youngest recruits who are most vulnerable to these risks?

Wed
24
Jun

Action Man: Battlefield Casuaties

Battlefield Casualties is a video produced by Veterans for Peace that highlights the cost of war, featuring Action Man dolls with accessories including antidepressants, wheelchairs, “benefits cancelled” letters and body bags – inspired, said artist Darren Cullen and film-maker Price James, by official Armed Forces toys, which include a Predator drone playset for five-year-olds.

Trigger warning: this video contains images and themes of depression, illegal drug use, death and suicide.

Action Man: Battlefield Casuaties
Wed
24
Jun

The Unseen March

Step by step, a military presence is entering schools across Britain. This is part of a conscious strategy to increase support for the armed forces in the wake of unpopular wars. Quakers in Britain have produced The Unseen March, a short film to start a public debate about the militarisation of education.

The Unseen March
Tue
23
Jun

Young People, the Military, and the Aftermath of the UK’s General Election

It has been more than a month since the General Elections in the UK which ended up with a Conservative Party majority in the Parliament. We asked Forces Watch* to review these results and their implications on the militarisation of youth in the UK for Antimili-Youth.

Mon
22
Jun

"War Is Not Family Entertainment"

"The Armed Forces Day 'family fun' extravaganza in Colwyn Bay's Parc Eirias went ahead on Saturday in intermittent drizzle and behind a prominent banner near the main gate stating what you'd have thought would be bleedin' obvious, but apparently to many punters wasn't: 'WAR IS NOT FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT'. "

It was Armed Forces Day in Wales last Saturday and a group of peace activists had some brilliant ideas to turn it into a day of peace and resistance! Here is their report from their direct action last weekend, which also includes their call out for actions as such in other cities of the UK on the official Armed Forces Day this Saturday:  

Background

Mon
22
Jun

Action Man: Battlefield Casualties - Exhibition And Film Screening

Veterans for Peace UK are releasing three dark satirical films about the reality of life and death in the army. The films will be shown as part of an exhibition at Red Gallery based on artist Darren Cullen's 'Action Man: Battlefield Casualties' toys.

Adress: 1-3 Rivington Street, London EC2A 3DT

Mon
22
Jun

War veterans call for rethink on recruitment of 16-year-olds

Former professionals condemn recruitment of teenagers by ‘pushing the notion of a noble military career to children’

A group of British war veterans will launch a campaign this week against enlisting 16-year-olds into the military.

Britain is the only state in Europe or Nato that still enlists minors, a policy criticised by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, the parliamentary joint committee on human rights and other groups including Child Soldiers International and British Quakers. The organisation Veterans For Peace (VFP) is demanding change, but the MoD says it depends on 16-year-olds for a quarter of the intake needed to sustain UK forces.

Thu
04
Jun

Arms companies are making money by taking over UK schools

By Andrew Smith

Corporations have already established a growing foothold in many UK schools, but the idea of Europe's biggest arms company running a school still seems like something out of an Orwellian nightmare.

Tue
05
May

Counter Recruitment in Belfast

Having been profoundly disturbed by recent figures suggesting that 1 in 10 prisoners in the UK prison system is an ex-soldier, disturbed by the amount of homeless people that come from an ex-service background and disturbed by how many of our ex-service men and women are cast adrift suffering post-traumatic stress after they leave the military, I was keen to see what mechanisms the Armed Forces had in place to remedy these issues. So, on Saturday 25th April I took myself off to the Armed Forces trades fair (Recruitment Day) in Belfast, to engage with serving personnel and the families of potential recruits. I decided that as well as quizzing the camouflaged salesmen, I would also approach the Mums and Dads with a view to informing them of the less appealing side of life as an Army recruit.

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