Britain

Fri
20
Mar
2015
New translation available
Submitted by antimili-youth

By Tracy Walker, Nottingham Post

Nottingham city centre stood to attention when shoppers were given an insight into life in the Armed forces.

Regular Army and Army reserve units from across the Midlands hosted a recruitment...

Sat
19
Nov

UK: Militarising Childhood

By Dr. Victoria M. Basham 

Since the late 2000s, successive British governments have put considerable resources into promoting greater recognition and support for the UK Armed Forces. The targeting of children has been integral to this. From the Ministry of Defence’s (MoD) recommendation that its ‘Armed Forces Days’ take place on Saturdays so that school children can more easily attend, to military provision of activities for classrooms, enhancing positive associations with the military, specifically among children, has been an aim from the outset.

Tue
18
Oct

UK: Under-18s in army 'face greater injury, death and mental health risks'

, The Guardian

Public health charity uses damning report to call for minimum recruitment age to be raised to 18.

Recruiting children aged 16 and 17 into the British army places them at greater risk of death, injury and long-term mental health problems than those recruited as adults, according to a new report.

Tue
11
Oct

David Gee at Movement for the Abolition of War Youth Conference

David Gee, from Child Soldiers International, gives a talk on British militarism.

Wed
05
Oct

UK: Michael Fallon launches army cadets scheme at 'Trojan horse' school

Jessica Elgot, The Guardian

Defence secretary announces 150 new units, with the first at Birmingham school at centre of row over alleged extremism

Michael Fallon has announced 150 new army cadet units for state schools, with the first launched on Tuesday at the Birmingham school at the centre of the“Trojan horse” row over alleged attempts to introduce a hardline Islamist ethos.

Thu
22
Sep

Scottish Parliament asks for more information on military visits to schools after hearing from ForcesWatch

ForcesWatch comment

Things have really moved on since ForcesWatch and Quakers in Scotland lodged a petition earlier this year with the backing of over a thousand signatures at the Scottish Parliament concerning military visits to state schools.

Back in March we asked Holyrood to ensure ‘guidance is provided to schools', ‘information is collected to provide public monitoring’ and ‘parents/guardians are consulted’ when it comes to visits by the military.

This reflected the work done with the Welsh Assembly in 2015 when Assembly Members in Cardiff agreed to support, in principle, greater oversight, guidance and balance in relation to how the armed forces operate in secondary schools. This decision was made in recognition of the unique nature of an armed forces career.

Wed
29
Jun

Five countries where child soldiers are still recruited

By Jared Ferrie, Irin News

Colombia’s largest guerrilla group has agreed to release all of its soldiers under age 15. It is a move welcomed by child rights groups but it also highlights the continued use of child soldiers in conflicts around the world.

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) made the pledge during talks in Cuba aimed at ending its five-decade war against successive governments. The administration of Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos and the FARC now need to decide upon the terms under which the child soldiers will be reintegrated into civilian life.

Thu
26
May

Subvertising: Don't Join the Army!

A very clever subversion of a recent British Army advert (which used 'reverse psychology' by telling people 'Don't join the Army. Don't become a better you. Don't improve your fitness.')

Unfortunately, they forgot to buy the domain name :)

http://dontjointhearmy.co.uk/

Thu
26
May

University of Southampton ends its investment in arms companies

Last week, the University of Southampton joined the growing list of Universities who have decided to take a stance against investments in the arms trade. In this article Sebastian, Odell of Southampton University explains what’s happened and how students forced the university into taking action.

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